Attic Ventilation

Over a decade in business serving Toledo area homeowners

Frogtown Roofing

Why is Attic Ventilation so Important?

In the summer, good ventilation helps reduce the heat build-up in your attic. This not only helps reduce the load on your home's air-conditioner, it can extend the life of your roof deck and shingles by reducing expansion. In the winter, a constant flow of cold air under the roof deck can help prevent ice dams and icicles from forming, reducing the carrying weight that is on your roof. Year-round, proper ventilation also helps guard against the creation of mold and rot, further improving the life span of your roof and roof deck.

Frogtown Roofing treats proper attic ventilation as a priority, not an afterthought. It's one of the first things we evaluate when we assess your home, to ensure that the roof we're putting on is going to last its full lifespan. We take photos to show you any problems we might find, then we explain how to make improvements. We also seek to maximize the air flow by installing ventilation chutes (also known as baffles) in every rafter cavity that is connected to a soffit. We do everything we can to ensure that your roof is going to last as long as possible, and will protect your home completely for decades to come.

Ventilation

Attics need to breathe in all climates. Proper attic ventilation will help increase home comfort, help ensure the life and performance of roofing materials, and may reduce utility bills. Several purposes of an attic ventilation system are to provide added comfort, to help protect against damage to materials and structure, and to help reduce energy consumption – during all four seasons of the year.

An effective attic ventilation system provides year-round benefits.

  • During warmer months, ventilation helps keep attics cool.
  • During colder months, ventilation reduces moisture to help keep attics dry.
  • Helps to prevent ice dams during long winter months.

Your goal should be to provide those benefits whenever you design and install an attic ventilation system.

Air flow and balanced system

A properly designed attic ventilation system requires balance. That balance is achieved in two ways:

1) Airflow capacity must be balanced between intake and exhaust vents. In general, the net free area [Net free area means the total unobstructed area (usually measured in square inches) through which air can enter or exhaust a non-powered ventilation component.] of intake venting should be equal to or greater than the net free area of exhaust venting.

2) Intake and exhaust vents must be positioned to create a proper high-low balance. That balance is achieved when two conditions are met:

• Half the vent area must be high in the attic, with the other half low in the attic.
• The vents placed high must act as exhaust vents, while the low vents act as intake vents. That placement assures a continuous flow of air, moving in the desired direction.

3) Intake and exhaust vents must be positioned so they assure continuous airflow along the underside of the roof sheathing.

This is where ventilation is most effective. During summer, airflow along the sheathing removes heat before it can radiate to the attic floor. During winter, airflow along the sheathing removes moisture before it can condense into water droplets or frost.

4) Intake vents must be located so there is little possibility of rain or snow infiltration. Intake vents should be placed in protected areas, the most convenient being in the soffit (the area underneath the eave of the house). Since some homes do not have soffits there is another way developed recently call EdgeVent (by Air Vent). This technology allows the intake ventilation be installed on top of the roof near the eaves. If properly installed it is guaranteed to provide the intake needed for necessary ventilation required.

5) Exhaust vents are designed to permit an efficient, unobstructed outflow of attic air. In addition, because they’re installed high in the attic where there’s greater exposure to the weather, these units must be designed to prevent (or at least minimize) rain and snow infiltration.

Exhaust vents must be used with intake vents to provide a balanced system and thus an adequate flow of air through an attic.

Options for exhaust vents include:

  • Ridge Vents
  • Roof Louvers
  • Gable Vents
  • Power Vents

Why is Attic Ventilation so Important?

In the summer, good ventilation helps reduce the heat build-up in your attic. This not only helps reduce the load on your home's air-conditioner, it can extend the life of your roof deck and shingles by reducing expansion. In the winter, a constant flow of cold air under the roof deck can help prevent ice dams and icicles from forming, reducing the carrying weight that is on your roof. Year-round, proper ventilation also helps guard against the creation of mold and rot, further improving the life span of your roof and roof deck.

Frogtown Roofing treats proper attic ventilation as a priority, not an afterthought. It's one of the first things we evaluate when we assess your home, to ensure that the roof we're putting on is going to last its full lifespan. We take photos to show you any problems we might find, then we explain how to make improvements. We also seek to maximize the air flow by installing ventilation chutes (also known as baffles) in every rafter cavity that is connected to a soffit. We do everything we can to ensure that your roof is going to last as long as possible, and will protect your home completely for decades to come.

ATTENTION:

The majority of roofing manufactures require a proper ventilated roofing system to qualify for their Liftetime Roof Warranties! If your contractor is not calculating your ventilation and proposing you solutions you may not want to choose that contractor.